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Brake for Yellow

Mar 9, 2013 1:00am - 11:00pm

Drivers throughout the state do it every day—make the decision to speed up to make a yellow traffic light or to yield instead. After losing a fellow classmate in fatal motorcycle accident, the students of Northwood University took to the community to make change happen with the goal of saving lives, creating the Brake for Yellow public service campaign.

“In a state where green means ‘go’ and yellow means ‘go faster’, it was time to create a public service campaign to tell motorist to take minute and slow down when driving, particularly through yellow lights,” said Jennifer McFarland, associate professor at Northwood University.

According to page 41 of the 2012 Florida Drivers Handbook, a yellow traffic signal indicates, “Stop if you can safely do so. The light will soon be red.”

According to DriversEdGuru.com, “Many drivers see a yellow light and start driving like they stole something. Remember, if you’re crossing into an intersection and the light becomes red, you’re breaking the law. You’re also creating a dangerous situation for cross traffic.”

The Brake for Yellow campaign was inspired by Houston Lillo, a Northwood University student who died in a fatal motorcycle accident after speeding through a yellow traffic signal. According to a vehicle homicide investigations report, Lillo's 2004 Honda motorcycle was in the outside westbound lane of Lake Worth Road approaching its intersection with Wycliffe Country Club Boulevard, just west of State Road 7. As the traffic signal cycled to yellow, Lillo changed lanes to avoid cars slowing to stop at the intersection.

“Houston was an amazing person and a smart student,” said McFarland. “He happened to make a bad choice in an effort to get to work on time. It’s a situation we have all been in. It just happened to cost Houston his life.”

After the death of Lilllo, the students of Northwood University wanted to turn tragedy into knowledge for those in the local community.

“We wanted to make something good out of something bad,” said Ricky Zamora, a Northwood University senior and former friend and teammate of Lillo. “By doing this campaign and sharing Houston’s story, maybe we can save a life.”

The Brake for Yellow campaign is part of a hands-on service learning class project.

The Brake for Yellow campaign is supported by the Lillo family.Drivers throughout the state do it every day—make the decision to speed up to make a yellow traffic light or to yield instead. After losing a fellow classmate in fatal motorcycle accident, the students of Northwood University took to the community to make change happen with the goal of saving lives, creating the Brake for Yellow public service campaign.

“In a state where green means ‘go’ and yellow means ‘go faster’, it was time to create a public service campaign to tell motorist to take minute and slow down when driving, particularly through yellow lights,” said Jennifer McFarland, associate professor at Northwood University.

According to page 41 of the 2012 Florida Drivers Handbook, a yellow traffic signal indicates, “Stop if you can safely do so. The light will soon be red.”

According to DriversEdGuru.com, “Many drivers see a yellow light and start driving like they stole something. Remember, if you’re crossing into an intersection and the light becomes red, you’re breaking the law. You’re also creating a dangerous situation for cross traffic.”

The Brake for Yellow campaign was inspired by Houston Lillo, a Northwood University student who died in a fatal motorcycle accident after speeding through a yellow traffic signal. According to a vehicle homicide investigations report, Lillo's 2004 Honda motorcycle was in the outside westbound lane of Lake Worth Road approaching its intersection with Wycliffe Country Club Boulevard, just west of State Road 7. As the traffic signal cycled to yellow, Lillo changed lanes to avoid cars slowing to stop at the intersection.

“Houston was an amazing person and a smart student,” said McFarland. “He happened to make a bad choice in an effort to get to work on time. It’s a situation we have all been in. It just happened to cost Houston his life.”

After the death of Lilllo, the students of Northwood University wanted to turn tragedy into knowledge for those in the local community.

“We wanted to make something good out of something bad,” said Ricky Zamora, a Northwood University senior and former friend and teammate of Lillo. “By doing this campaign and sharing Houston’s story, maybe we can save a life.”

The Brake for Yellow campaign is part of a hands-on service learning class project.

The Brake for Yellow campaign is supported by the Lillo family.
 


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